Have you ever wondered how your eyes work? No? Well we are going to tell you anyway. We could give you the doctor version of how eyes work with big, fancy words, but instead we're going to break it down in the most simple version. Because even doctors get tired of using big, fancy words.

Basically, your eyes work similarly to a camera. Light passes through the lens of your eye and is 'recorded' on the back of your eye, which is the retina. Before reaching the retina, the cornea bends, or refracts, the light that pass through a round hole called the pupil. The iris, or colored portion of the eye that surrounds the pupil, opens and closes (making the pupil bigger or smaller) to regulate the amount of light passing through. 

Yes, we used a kid's drawing for our illustration. We wanted it to be fun.

Yes, we used a kid's drawing for our illustration. We wanted it to be fun.

The purpose of the lens is to focus light onto the retina. In this process, the lens actually refracts the light or image, so it is upside down when it reaches the retina. Just like a camera, the retina receives the upside down-version of the light, converts the image and sends it to our brain through the optic nerve so we know what we are looking at.

So there you have it. The basics of how your eyes work. In case we weren't thorough enough, check out Bill Nye's version. He has visual aids.